Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 46  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 21--26

The therapeutic application of functional electrical stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation in rehabilitation of the hand function in incomplete cervical spinal cord injury


Shereen Fawaz1, Fatma Kamel1, Ahmed El Yasaky1, Heba El Shishtawy1, Ahmed Genedy2, Reda M Awad3, Lobna El Nabil4 
1 Department of Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
2 Department of Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Armed Forces Military Academy, Cairo, Egypt
3 Department of Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, El Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
4 Department of Neurology, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Shereen Fawaz
2 El Maryland Buildings, Gesr El Suez, Flat 901, Ain Shams University, Cairo, 11757
Egypt

Background Functional electrical stimulation (FES) therapy has a potential to improve voluntary grasping and induce plastic changes among individuals with tetraplegia secondary to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Also, evidence suggests that the use of high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to increase corticomotor excitability improves hand function in persons with cervical SCI. Purpose Our randomized controlled trial was carried out to compare the two rehabilitation programs, the first applied to FES and real rTMS whereas the second applied to FES and sham rTMS, with repect to hand function in chronic traumatic incomplete cervical SCI patients, and also with respect to changes in cortical excitability, and its relation to hand function before and after the rehabilitation programs. Patients and methods Our study included 22 patients with chronic traumatic incomplete SCI. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups, 11 patients each. Group I patients received FES for 12 weeks with an additional real rTMS therapy for the last two weeks, at 10 Hz frequency, subthreshold intensity for a total of 1500 pulse per session for 10 sessions. Whereas group II patients received FES for 12 weeks with an additional sham rTMS therapy for the last two weeks. All were followed by an intensive hand training program. Patients were assessed: using hand function tests (action research arm test, modified Sollerman hand function test, nine-hole pegboard scale, and finger tapping test) and corticomotor excitability tests (using amplitude of motor evoked potential). Conclusion Our study showed statistically significant improvements in hand function tests in group I, who received FES in addition to real rTMS therapy in comparison with group II, who received FES in addition to sham rTMS at 12-week assessment. This could support the evidence of the additional benefit of real rTMS therapy for 10 sessions/2 weeks in improving hand function and motor recovery following SCI.


How to cite this article:
Fawaz S, Kamel F, El Yasaky A, El Shishtawy H, Genedy A, Awad RM, El Nabil L. The therapeutic application of functional electrical stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation in rehabilitation of the hand function in incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.Egypt Rheumatol Rehabil 2019;46:21-26


How to cite this URL:
Fawaz S, Kamel F, El Yasaky A, El Shishtawy H, Genedy A, Awad RM, El Nabil L. The therapeutic application of functional electrical stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation in rehabilitation of the hand function in incomplete cervical spinal cord injury. Egypt Rheumatol Rehabil [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Feb 22 ];46:21-26
Available from: http://www.err.eg.net/article.asp?issn=1110-161X;year=2019;volume=46;issue=1;spage=21;epage=26;aulast=Fawaz;type=0